Why pink dolphins - ADNTRO

Why some dolphins are pink?

A Pink Dolphin? Yes, to be more specific it’s an albine Dolphin - This occurs when cells that normally make the pigment melanin, responsible for skin, hair, and eye color, fail to produce it at normal levels, or produce melanin at all.

The Genes involved in albinism for Dolphins are actually the same as in humans; DNA tests can determine the precise type of albinism.

Research on albinism genes is ongoing. To date as many as seven forms of oculocutaneous albinism are now recognized.

This is usually because of a mutation in one of several genes (including TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and SLC45A2).

Curiosities about pink dolphins

When it comes to curiosities, Pinky’s parents might have looked like typical dolphins, but both of them must have carried a single copy of the mutation in the same gene. Combined, those mutations resulted in the marine mammal's distinctive color.

“Pinky” has been around for about eight years, but albinism can come with several different health problems. The pigment melanin provides protection against the sun’s rays, and also plays an important role in eyesight.

In ADNTRO we work hard to help you discover what your genes say about you and have a unique journey inside your DNA with the most complete information, updated periodically across all areas (Ancestry/origins, Nutrition & Sports, Behaviour, Pharmacogenetics and health predispositions) – check it out here.

en_USEnglish